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When Should I Buy New Tires


Tread wear bars are small, raised bits of rubber that run between the tread blocks. As these bars become even with the top of the tread, it is likely time for new tires. See more about tread wear bars below.




when should i buy new tires



There are many factors that may cause uneven wear, which could shorten the life of your tires. Vehicle alignment, tire pressure, lack of rotation, and/or worn steering and suspension components can all contribute to this problem. To prolong the life of your tires and reduce uneven wear, consider getting them rotated at consistent intervals. At Les Schwab, we recommend getting them rotated every 5,000 milles. The pros at Les Schwab will also conduct a free visual inspection of your steering and suspension components. Schedule your free, pre-trip safety check today.


All tires deflate slowly over time, usually about 1 PSI (pounds per square inch) per month. Check yours monthly to keep them properly inflated. If your tires continually lose air or seem to completely deflate without warning, you may need to stop by Les Schwab for tire repair or replacement if necessary. Does the TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) light often appear on your dash? This could mean your tires have developed a slow, continuous leak.


If you hit a curb, pothole or other obstacle, your tires can develop sidewall bulges due to a break of the inner liner. These bulges can rupture causing a potentially unsafe situation. If you spot a bulge on your tires, get to your nearby Les Schwab and have your tires inspected.


If you experience new vibrations or thumping while driving, it could be a sign that one of your tire/wheel assemblies is out of balance. It could also indicate a suspension issue. Stop by your local Les Schwab and our professionals will check your tires, steering, and suspension.


Depending on where and how you drive, and the conditions you face on the road, you might consider getting new tires before they reach that point. City driving in mild conditions may allow you to wait until the tread is closer to the tread wear bar before replacing your tires. More adverse conditions, such as rain, snow, and unpaved roads, may require you to replace your tires earlier.


With President Lincoln's head pointed down, insert a penny into the grooves on your tire tread. If any part of Lincoln's head is hidden by the tire tread, your tires are fine. Otherwise, your treads are too shallow and it's time to replace your tires.


Insert a penny into your tire's tread groove with Lincoln's head upside down and facing you. If you can see all of Lincoln's head, your tire tread depth is less than 2/32 inch and it's time to replace your tires.


You can also check the tread wear indicator. You can find the tread wear indicator less than an inch (2/32 of an inch) from the bottom of the tread groove. When the tread wears down to become even with this level, the tire should be replaced.


Check the manufacturing date of your tires by examining the sidewalls. The manufacturing date is shown through the last four digits of the number that starts with DOT. The first two digits represent the week made and the second two represent the year made.


Rich Ceppos has evaluated automobiles and automotive technology during a career that has encompassed 10 years at General Motors, two stints at Car and Driver totaling 19 years, and thousands of miles logged in racing cars. He was in music school when he realized what he really wanted to do in life and, somehow, it's worked out. In between his two C/D postings he served as executive editor of Automobile Magazine; was an executive vice president at Campbell Marketing & Communications; worked in GM's product-development area; and became publisher of Autoweek. He has raced continuously since college, held SCCA and IMSA pro racing licenses, and has competed in the 24 Hours of Daytona. He currently ministers to a 1999 Miata and a 1965 Corvette convertible and appreciates that none of his younger colleagues have yet uttered "Okay, Boomer" when he tells one of his stories about the crazy old days at C/D.


Rich Ceppos has evaluated automobiles and automotive technology during a career that has encompassed 10 years at General Motors, two stints at Car and Driver totaling 19 years, and thousands of miles logged in racing cars. He was in music school when he realized what he really wanted to do in life and, somehow, it's worked out. In between his two C/D postings he served as executive editor of Automobile Magazine; was an executive vice president at Campbell Marketing & Communications; worked in GM's product-development area; and became publisher of Autoweek. He has raced continuously since college, held SCCA and IMSA pro racing licenses, and has competed in the 24 Hours of Daytona. He currently ministers to a 1999 Miata and a 1965 Corvette convertible and appreciates that none of his younger colleagues have yet uttered \"Okay, Boomer\" when he tells one of his stories about the crazy old days at C/D.


To find the best time to buy tires, we spoke with Will Robbins, director of consumer product strategy at Bridgestone Americas. Robbins shares his expert opinion on the top signs your car needs new tires, tips to help you save money the next time you buy tires, the difference between old and new tires, and the best time to buy tires. Are you ready for a vehicle upgrade, to live free on the road or simply take more comfortable road trips? Find out the best time to buy a new car and the best time to buy an RV too.


Drivers in winter climates typically make the switch to winter tires in October or November to get their cars ready for winter, then convert back to all-season or summer tires in March or April. Retailers in colder climates often align promotions with these months, which would end up being the best time to buy tires. Additionally, retailers will sometimes offer promotions ahead of the busy summer travel season, as they know drivers are prepping their vehicles for more time on the road.


Bridgestone strongly advises against purchasing used tires because of the known safety concerns. A damaged, improperly repaired or used tire can cause a wide range of incidents that can not only total a vehicle, but cause injuries. Even minor damage to a tire can cause serious problems, including tread separation and sidewall blowout. Here are the tires car experts buy for their own vehicles.


The best time to buy tires is before you are in desperate need of them. This will allow you to shop around, wait for holiday specials and get the best deal possible on tires. Waiting too long to replace your tires is one of the driving mistakes too many drivers make.


According to Bridgestone, all-season tires offer the average driver a perfect blend of capabilities that provide acceptable performance in wet and dry conditions, and even traction in snowy conditions, meaning there is never a bad time to buy all-season tires.


If the tires haven't been replaced 10 years after their date of manufacture, as a precaution, Michelin recommends replacing them with new tires. Even if they appear to be in usable condition and have not worn down to the tread wear indicator. This applies to spare tires as well.


On average, tires last about six years or between 36,000-75,000 miles. But the actual lifespan of tires varies with factors like climate, maintenance and driving habits. No matter how they look, tires should never be used longer than 10 years.


All tires will start to deteriorate over time. Even if they have very little mileage on them, their tread will start to become thinner. So while you might get more than the average five to six years out of a tire, always replace tires before they hit their 10-year anniversaries regardless of how often you drive.


Tires are the most important safety and performance features on your vehicle. Driving on old and overly worn tires puts you and other motorists at a huge risk, as they prevent your vehicle from performing optimally. But when do you know it's time to replace your tires? To help you learn more about tires, the automotive experts at Sunnyside Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, and Ram have put together this helpful page. Read on to learn more about tire health and replacement intervals.


Because these factors can vary so greatly, it's best to check your tires yourself by using a simple trick. Take a penny and place Abe's head into your tire's tread. If your tires are in good condition, you should not be able to see his head over your tire tread. If you can see the top of his forehead or lower, your tires are too worn and need to be replaced.


Right away! Just because the weather is nice doesn't mean you should neglect buying new tires for your car. Even when conditions are clear and dry, bald tires can be extremely dangerous. If you're concerned about saving money, buying new tires will help improve your fuel economy as well, so not buying new tires can actually be costing you money!


By checking out our Mopar rebates and getting your new rubber at Sunnyside Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, and Ram in McHenry! With our always-changing deals and huge selection of tires, our service center is the perfect place to go when it's time to get your car, truck, or SUV a new set of shoes.


Consistent wear around the whole tire is normal. Uneven tread wear could be a sign of improper inflation, wheel misalignment, or a variety of other things. If you see uneven tread wear, you should have a technician inspect your vehicle.


If you are in a situation where you will be replacing fewer than four tires, select tires that are similar to what is currently installed on your vehicle. If you are replacing just two tires, those two tires should only be installed on the rear axle. You should only consider tires that are within the same category as your existing ones.


When it comes to recalled tires, there is only one position to take. We do not want anyone driving on recalled tires. We are committed to replacing, free of charge, any Bridgestone or Firestone tire (or other brands warranted by Bridgestone) subject to a customer satisfaction, quality and/or safety recall, at any time. The easiest way for consumers to get answers to questions about recalled tires is to call 1-844-293-7514 or locate an authorized Bridgestone or Firestone dealer to examine the tires in question. You can also check current tire recalls online at the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration site. 041b061a72


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